Come visit us at The Museum of Military Memorabilia. We have thousands of military artifacts from all branches of the Military. The Museum is located in the Naples Municipal Airport which was originally built by the Army Corps of Engineers to train pilots for the pacific theater in WWII.

What has begun as a Museum Honoring Military Aviation in WWII has evolved into so much more. You can now see historical artifacts dating back to the Revolutionary War and all the way up to the present day Iraq & Afghanistan conflicts.


2012 marked the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Naples Airport as a WWII Army Air Forces Training Base.


TAPS played as you’ve probably never heard it…

 …The Silence…

TAPS played as you’ve probably never heard it…The Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial

In the village of Margraten, about six miles from Maastricht. There lie buried 8,301 American soldiers killed in the battles to liberate Holland in the fall winter of 1944-5.

Sgt. Bill Dukeman, 101st Airborne Division, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Second Battalion, Company C is buried there. He was killed in the battle of “The Crossroads” in northern Holland.

The Dutch hold an annual memorial concert every September at The Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial to remember and honor the Americans who died to free them in Operation Market Garden and subsequent
efforts to eject the German army from Holland. Sgt. Dukeman, like many other fallen GIs, was “adopted” by a Dutch family. Dukeman’s family in the States was contacted and hosted in Holland,and his grave site decorated each year by his Dutch “family.” They keep his portrait in their home, displayed in a place of honor. Fathers pass this obligation down to their sons in Holland.

This version
of the original “taps” music is played by a 13 year old Dutch girl named Melissa Venema.

The conductor of the orchestra is recently deceased

Andre Rieu from
Holland .

Many of you may never have heard taps played in its entirety .
The original version of Taps was called Last Post, and was written by Daniel Butterfield in 1801.

It was rather lengthy and formal, as you will hear in this
video, so in 1862 it was shortened to 24 notes and re-named Taps.

Melissa Venema
is playing it on a trumpet whereby the original was played on a bugle.

 

 

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